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Student-Athletes face challenges everyday on and off the field in and out of uniform. Domonique Hargrove founded The Slight Edge Performance Program in 2010 during his road to the NFL draft. He saw a need to serve student-athletes and empower them with knowledge, Vision and Opportunity to achieve their full potential in every area of life.The Slight Edge Performance Program is fueled by 4 Value-Based Components: 1. Academic Excellence 2. Elite Athletic Development 3. Character Development and 4. Leadership in Business. We are setting a higher standard for student-athletes. Our Mission is to Empower, Inspire and Educate Student-Athletes to develop their own personal brand and use their influence, value and credibility to Achieve at the Highest Level in Life!

Understanding Neurotransmitters and Their Role in Brain Health

Structure of a typical chemical synapse. neurotransmitter release mechanisms. Neurotransmitters are packaged into synaptic vesicles transmit signals from a neuron to a target cell across a synapse.
Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of "Slight Edge Performance Program" LLC
Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

What Is A Neurotransmitter?

Neurotransmitters are often referred to as the body’s chemical messengers. They are the molecules used by the nervous system to transmit messages between neurons, or from neurons to muscles.

Neurotransmitters work with receptors in the brain to influence and regulate a wide range of processes such as mental performance, emotions, pain response and energy levels. Numerous clinical studies have shown that inadequate neurotransmitter function has a profound influence on overall health and well-being.

A neurotransmitter is a chemical substance that is released at the end of a nerve fiber by the arrival of a nerve impulse and, by diffusing across the synapse or junction, causes the transfer of the impulse to another nerve fiber, a muscle fiber, or some other structure.

What is the Role of Neurotransmitters?

Functioning primarily in the Central Nervous System neurotransmitters are the brain’s chemical messengers, facilitating communication among the body’s glands, organs, and muscles. Neurotransmitters work with receptors in the brain to influence and regulate a wide range of processes such as mental performance, emotions, pain response and energy levels. Numerous clinical studies have shown that inadequate neurotransmitter function has a profound influence on overall health and well-being. In fact, imbalances in certain neurotransmitters are associated with most of these prevalent symptoms and health conditions:

  • Mood disorders; depression, anxiety
  • Adrenal dysfunction; fatigue, insomnia
  • Loss of mental focus; ADD, ADHD, cognitive fog
  • Addiction and dependency
  • Hormonal imbalances; E2 dominance, E2 deficiency, low androgens
  • Loss of appetite control; insulin resistance

Neurotransmitter, also called chemical transmitter or chemical messenger, any of a group of chemical agents released by neurons (nerve cells) to stimulate neighboring neurons or muscle or gland cells, thus allowing impulses to be passed from one cell to the next throughout the nervous system.

Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemicals acting as signaling molecules that enable neurotransmission. They are a type of chemical messenger which transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron to another ‘target’ neuron, to a muscle cell, or to a gland cell.

Billions of neurotransmitter molecules work constantly to keep our brains functioning, managing everything from our breathing to our heartbeat to our learning and concentration levels. They can also affect a variety of psychological functions such as fear, mood, pleasure, and joy.

How Neurotransmitters Work

In order for neurons to send messages throughout the body, they need to be able to communicate with one another to transmit signals. However, neurons are not simply connected to one another. At the end of each neuron is a tiny gap called a synapse and in order to communicate with the next cell, the signal needs to be able to cross this small space. This occurs through a process known as neurotransmission.

In most cases, a neurotransmitter is released from what’s known as the axon terminal after an action potential has reached the synapse, a place where neurons can transmit signals to each other.

When an electrical signal reaches the end of a neuron, it triggers the release of small sacs called vesicles that contain the neurotransmitters. These sacs spill their contents into the synapse, where the neurotransmitters then move across the gap toward the neighboring cells. These cells contain receptors where the neurotransmitters can bind and trigger changes in the cells.

After release, the neurotransmitter crosses the synaptic gap and attaches to the receptor site on the other neuron, either exciting or inhibiting the receiving neuron depending on what the neurotransmitter is.

Receptors and neurotransmitters act like a lock-and-key system. Just as it takes the right key to open a specific lock, a neurotransmitter (the key) will only bind to a specific receptor (the lock). If the neurotransmitter is able to work on the receptor site, it triggers changes in the receiving cell.

Sometimes neurotransmitters can bind to receptors and cause an electrical signal to be transmitted down the cell (excitatory). In other cases, the neurotransmitter can actually block the signal from continuing, preventing the message from being carried on (inhibitory).

Neurotransmitters are the brains chemical that communicate information throughout your brain and body. They relay information between neuron to neuron. Without neurotransmitters your brain would fail to utilize serotonin, dopemine, norepinephrine and much more needed chemicals that is vital to both your brain and body.

Types Of Neurotransmitters

There are more than 40 neurotransmitters in the human nervous system; some of the most important are acetylcholine, norepinephrine, dopamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, serotonin, and histamine.

1. Acetylcholine:

Acetylcholine is an organic chemical that functions in the brain and body of many types of animals as a neurotransmitter—a chemical message released by nerve cells to send signals to other cells, such as neurons, muscle cells and gland cells.

Acetylcholine is the chief neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system, the part of the autonomic nervous system (a branch of the peripheral nervous system) that contracts smooth muscles, dilates blood vessels, increases bodily secretions, and slows heart rate.

2. Norepinephrine:

Norepinephrine is a naturally occurring chemical in the body that acts as both a stress hormone and neurotransmitter (a substance that sends signals between nerve cells). It’s released into the blood as a stress hormone when the brain perceives that a stressful event has occurred.

Norepinephrine also called noradrenaline is both a hormone, produced by the adrenal glands, and a neurotransmitter, a chemical messenger which transmits signals across nerve endings in the body. Together with other hormones, norepinephrine helps the body respond to stress and exercise.

3. Dopamine:

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter, one of those chemicals that is responsible for transmitting signals between the nerve cells (neurons) of the brain. Some, in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra, are the cells that die during Parkinson’s disease.

Dopamine is known as the feel-good neurotransmitter—a chemical that ferries information between neurons. The brain releases it when we eat food that we crave or while we have sex, contributing to feelings of pleasure and satisfaction as part of the reward system.

Dopamine released during pleasurable situations and stimulates one to seek out the pleasurable activity or occupation. This means food, sex, and several drugs of abuse are also stimulants of dopamine release in the brain, particularly in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex.

4. Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid:

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a naturally occurring amino acid that works as a neurotransmitter in your brain. Neurotransmitters function as chemical messengers. GABA is considered an inhibitory neurotransmitter because it blocks, or inhibits, certain brain signals and decreases activity in your nervous system.

Gamma-Aminobutyric acid, or γ-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, is the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter in the developmentally mature mammalian central nervous system. Its principal role is reducing neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system.

5. Glutamate:

In neuroscience, glutamate refers to the anion of glutamic acid in its role as a neurotransmitter: a chemical that nerve cells use to send signals to other cells. It is by a wide margin the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate nervous system.

Glutamate is a powerful excitatory neurotransmitter that is released by nerve cells in the brain. It is responsible for sending signals between nerve cells, and under normal conditions it plays an important role in learning and memory.

Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Glutamate pathways are linked to many other neurotransmitter pathways, and glutamate receptors are found throughout the brain and spinal cord in neurons and glia.

6. Serotonin:

Serotonin is a chemical nerve cells produce. It sends signals between your nerve cells. Serotonin is found mostly in the digestive system, although it’s also in blood platelets and throughout the central nervous system. Serotonin is made from the essential amino acid tryptophan.

In the brain, serotonin helps with mood regulation and memory, but the neurotransmitter also has important jobs in other parts of the body. In fact, most of the serotonin in your body is found in your gut, not your brain. Not only do the intestines produce almost all of the body’s serotonin supply, but serotonin is required there to promote healthy digestion.

Elsewhere in the body, serotonin also helps with sleep, sexual function, bone health, and blood clotting.

7. Histamine:

Histamine is an organic nitrogenous compound involved in local immune responses, as well as regulating physiological function in the gut and acting as a neurotransmitter for the brain, spinal cord, and uterus. Histamine is involved in the inflammatory response and has a central role as a mediator of itching.

Histamine is found in nearly all tissues of the body, where it is stored primarily in the granules of tissue mast cells. The blood cells called basophils also harbour histamine-containing granules. Once released from its granules, histamine produces many varied effects within the body, including the contraction of smooth muscle tissues of the lungs, uterus, and stomach; the dilation of blood vessels, which increases permeability and lowers blood pressure; the stimulation of gastric acid secretion in the stomach; and the acceleration of heart rate. Histamine also serves as a neurotransmitter, carrying chemical messages between nerve cells.

Neurotransmitters work with receptors in the brain to influence and regulate a wide range of processes such as mental performance, emotions, pain response and energy levels. Numerous clinical studies have shown that inadequate neurotransmitter function has a profound influence on overall health and well-being.

Nutrients to Build Neurotransmitters

Consuming adequate levels of the basic nutrients for neurotransmitters through select foods including protein for the amino acids, vitamin C, the B-vitamins and iron, may help to bring body levels of neurotransmitters in balance.

What you eat has the potential to impact your mood and improve your cognitive function. Research as shown eating a diet high in sodium, saturated fat, and calories correlated to a negative mood. However a dietary pattern corresponding with a more positive mood included consuming fewer calories, less saturated fat, and reduced sodium.

This food-mood connection likely comes from the effects of certain nutrients and foods on neurotransmitters, including consuming the neurotransmitters themselves. There are also important precursors to neurotransmitters you must ensure you have in sufficient amounts for a healthy brain and communication throughout your body.

There are many nutrients essential to the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitters, including amino acids (especially the precursors tryptophan and tyrosine), choline, vitamin C, B-vitamins (especially B6, B12, and folate), large amino acids (i.e., valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine), zinc, iron, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin D. There are certain foods known for their overall benefits for the brain. One example is tea, most likely due in part because theanine increases serotonin, dopamine, and GABA levels in the brain.

Consuming adequate levels of the basic nutrients for neurotransmitters, including protein for the amino acids, vitamin C, the B-vitamins, and iron, can go a long way to a healthy brain and more balanced neurotransmitter levels.

The brain requires a constant supply of micronutrients for energy metabolism of neurons and glial cells, neurotransmitter synthesis and action, nerve impulse propagation, and homocysteine metabolism.

Good nutritional status is important for proper brain development and maintenance of normal cognitive function. Through unique biological functions, various micronutrients affect brain function.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References:https://www.marlenesmarket-deli.com/nutrition-for-neurotransmitters, https://www.britannica.com/science/histamine, https://www.deannaminich.com/eating-for-your-neurotransmitters/, https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/health-disease/cognitive-function, https://www.kenhub.com/en/library/anatomy/neurotransmitters, https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-a-neurotransmitter-2795394, https://qbi.uq.edu.au/brain/brain-physiology/what-are-neurotransmitters

Understanding Your Immune System and How To Keep It Energetic and Healthy

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of "Slight Edge Performance Program" LLC
Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Immune System?

The immune system is a complex network of cells and proteins that defends the body against infection. The immune system keeps a record of every germ (microbe) it has ever defeated so it can recognize and destroy the microbe quickly if it enters the body again.

Our immune system is essential for our survival. Without an immune system, our bodies would be open to attack from bacteria, viruses, parasites, and more. It is our immune system that keeps us healthy as we drift through a sea of pathogens.

The immune system is made up of special organs, cells and chemicals that fight infection (microbes). The main parts of the immune system are: white blood cells, antibodies, the complement system, the lymphatic system, the spleen, the thymus, and the bone marrow. These are the parts of your immune system that actively fight infection.

Lymphatic system

Parts of The Immune System

The main parts of the immune system are: white blood cells, antibodies, the complement system, the lymphatic system, the spleen, the thymus, and the bone marrow. These are the parts of your immune system that actively fight infection.

The key primary lymphoid organs of the immune system include the thymus and bone marrow, as well as secondary lymphatic tissues including spleen, tonsils, lymph vessels, lymph nodes, adenoids, skin, and liver.

White Blood Cells

White blood cells are the key players in your immune system. They are made in your bone marrow and are part of the lymphatic system

White blood cells move through blood and tissue throughout your body, looking for foreign invaders (microbes) such as bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi. When they find them, they launch an immune attack.  White blood cells include lymphocytes (such as B-cells, T-cells and natural killer cells), and many other types of immune cells

Antibodies

Antibodies help the body to fight microbes or the toxins (poisons) they produce. They do this by recognizing substances called antigens on the surface of the microbe, or in the chemicals they produce, which mark the microbe or toxin as being foreign. The antibodies then mark these antigens for destruction. There are many cells, proteins and chemicals involved in this attack. 

Complement System

The complement system is made up of proteins whose actions complement the work done by antibodies. The complement system is a part of the immune system that enhances (complements) the ability of antibodies and phagocytic cells to clear microbes and damaged cells from an organism, promotes inflammation, and attacks the pathogen’s plasma membrane.

The Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system is a network of delicate tubes throughout the body. The main roles of the lymphatic system are to:

  • manage the fluid levels in the body
  • react to bacteria
  • deal with cancer cells 
  • deal with cell products that otherwise would result in disease or disorders
  • absorb some of the fats in our diet from the intestine. 

The lymphatic system is made up of:

  • lymph nodes (also called lymph glands) — which trap microbes
  • lymph vessels — tubes that carry lymph, the colourless fluid that bathes your body’s tissues and contains infection-fighting white blood cells
  • white blood cells (lymphocytes).

The Spleen

The spleen is a blood-filtering organ that removes microbes and destroys old or damaged red blood cells. It also makes disease-fighting components of the immune system (including antibodies and lymphocytes).

The spleen is the largest organ in the lymphatic system. It is an important organ for keeping bodily fluids balanced, but it is possible to live without it. The spleen is located under the ribcage and above the stomach in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. A spleen is soft and generally looks purple.

Bone marrow

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside your bones. It produces the red blood cells our bodies need to carry oxygen, the white blood cells we use to fight infection, and the platelets we need to help our blood clot.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can develop into the red blood cells that carry oxygen through your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting.

The Thymus

The thymus filters and monitors your blood content. It produces the white blood cells called T-lymphocytes.

The thymus serves a vital role in the training and development of T-lymphocytes or T cells, an extremely important type of white blood cell. T cells defend the body from potentially deadly pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

The thymus produces progenitor cells, which mature into T-cells (thymus-derived cells). The body uses T-cells help destroy infected or cancerous cells. T-cells created by the thymus also help other organs in the immune system grow properly.

Your immune system is a large network of organs, white blood cells, proteins (antibodies) and chemicals. This system works together to protect you from foreign invaders (bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi) that cause infection, illness and disease.

How can I keep my immune system healthy?

Just like the rest of your body, your immune system needs nourishment, rest, and a healthy environment to stay strong. Certain lifestyle changes have been proven to boost immune systems and help you avoid illness.

Manage Your Stress

Everyone gets stressed. Short bursts of stress may help your immune system. But lasting stress is a problem. It can hamper your immune system.

You can take action to tame stress. Make these steps part of your stress management plan:

  • Get enough sleep.
  • Learn and use relaxation techniques.
  • Exercise.
  • Take time for yourself.
  • Build your support network of people you can talk to.
  • Consider counseling, especially when you’re going through a very stressful time.
Get the Nutrients You Need

Food is your best source. Fill half your plate with vegetables and fruit, and split the other half between lean protein and grains, as the government’s “MyPlate” guidelines recommend.

Good nutrition is essential to a strong immune system, which may offer protection from seasonal illness and other health problems. No one food or supplement can prevent illness but you may help support your immune system by including these nutrients in your overall eating plan on a regular basis.

Protein plays a role in the body’s immune system, especially for healing and recovery. Eat a variety of protein foods including seafood, lean meat, poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products and unsalted nuts and seeds.

Vitamin A helps regulate the immune system and protect against infections by keeping skin and tissues in the mouth, stomach, intestines and respiratory system healthy. Get this vitamin from foods such as sweet potatoes, carrots, broccoli, spinach, red bell peppers, apricots, eggs or foods labeled “vitamin A fortified,” such as milk or some cereals.

Vitamin C supports the immune system by stimulating the formation of antibodies. Include more sources of this healthy vitamin by choosing citrus fruits such as oranges, grapefruit and tangerines, or red bell pepper, papaya, strawberries, tomato juice or foods fortified with vitamin C, such as some cereals.

Vitamin E works as an antioxidant and may support immune function. Include vitamin E in your diet with fortified cereals, sunflower seeds, almonds, vegetable oils (such as sunflower or safflower oil), hazelnuts and peanut butter.

Zinc helps the immune system work properly and may help wounds heal. Zinc can be found in lean meat, poultry, seafood, milk, whole grain products, beans, seeds and nuts.

Other nutrients, including vitamin B6, B12, copper, folate, selenium and iron also may support immune response and play a role in a healthful eating style.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: https://www.livescience.com, https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21196-immune-system, https://symptoms.webmd.com/cold-flu-map/keep-immune-system-healthy, https://www.eatright.org, https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/immune-system, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com, https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/immune-system

Understanding The Neuroendocrine System and How To Keep It Energetic and Healthy

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of "Slight Edge Performance Program" LLC
Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Neuroendocrine System?

The neuroendocrine system is made up of special cells called neuroendocrine cells. They are spread throughout the body. Neuroendocrine cells are like nerve cells (neurons), but they also make hormones like cells of the endocrine system (endocrine cells). They receive messages (signals) from the nervous system and respond by making and releasing hormones. These hormones control many body functions.

Neuroendocrine systems can be defined as the sets of neurons, glands and non-endocrine tissues, and the neurochemicals, hormones, and humoral signals they produce and receive, that function in an integrated manner to collectively regulate a physiological or behavioral state.

What Are Neuroendocrine Cells

Neuroendocrine cells are like nerve cells (neurons), but they also make hormones like cells of the endocrine system (endocrine cells). They receive messages (signals) from the nervous system and respond by making and releasing hormones.

Neuroendocrine cells are spread throughout the human body, but are mainly found in the small intestine, pancreas, and lung bronchioles.

Where Neuroendocrine Cells Are Located

Neuroendocrine cells are found in almost every organ of the body. They are mainly found scattered in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (including the small intestine, rectum, stomach, colon, esophagus and appendix), the gallbladder, the pancreas (islet cells) and the thyroid (C cells). Neuroendocrine cells are also commonly found in the lungs or airways into the lungs (bronchi), as well as the respiratory tract of the head and neck. The neuroendocrine cells scattered throughout these organs are often referred to as the diffuse neuroendocrine system.

The pituitary gland, the parathyroid glands and the inner layer of the adrenal gland (adrenal medulla) are almost all made up of neuroendocrine cells.

Other sites of neuroendocrine cells include the thymus, kidneys, liver, prostate, skin, cervix, ovaries and testicles.

The neuroendocrine system comprises the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and glands involved in release of their respective hormones, that is, the adrenal glands and the gonads. The HPA axis exerts its effects primarily through release of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids by the cortex of the adrenal glands.

What Is Neuroendocrinology?

Neuroendocrinology is the branch of biology (specifically of physiology) which studies the interaction between the nervous system and the endocrine system, that is how the brain regulates the hormonal activity in the body.

Neuroendocrinology is the discipline that studies hormone production by neurons, the sensitivity of neurons for hormones, as well as the dynamic, bidirectional interactions between neurons and endocrine glands.

Neuroendocrinology investigates interactions between the nervous and endocrine systems. The nervous system is composed of the brain, spinal cord, ganglia, and nerves, and neural cells communicate directly with one another (and with cells of sensory and effector tissues) by means of neurotransmitters. The endocrine system is composed of ductless glands that release hormones that act systemically. Neuroendocrinology therefore investigates reciprocal influences of local and widespread chemical signaling systems in animals. Research in neuroendocrinology historically examined several distinct but related processes.

Secretion of neuropeptide releasing factors from the hypothalamus (neurosecretion) was found to control the pituitary gland, which, in turn, governs many endocrine functions. The pattern of neuropeptide secretion is pulsatile and characterized by circadian and ultradian variations. The nervous system directly regulates the pineal gland and adrenal medulla. Thyroid hormones, steroids, and peptide hormones have important feedback effects regulating the neural control of their release. Hormones clearly regulate development of the nervous system.

A variety of adult brain systems are influenced by hormones, and behavioral neuroendocrinology has become a fertile area. Most recently, several classes of hormones, such as neurosteroids, have been found to be synthesized and have neurotransmitter-like actions within the brain, thus blurring the distinction between endocrine and neuronal signaling systems.

The field of neuroendocrinology has expanded from its original focus on the control of pituitary hormone secretion by the hypothalamus to encompass multiple reciprocal interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and endocrine systems in the control of homeostasis and physiologic responses to environmental stimuli.

Neuroendocrinology is the study of how the nervous system controls hormonal secretion and how, in turn, hormones affect the nervous system. The brain-pituitary neuroendocrine system processes information from and enables endocrine responses to external factors, such as stress, day length, and changes in ambient temperature. Attention here is focused on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and related neuroendocrine systems involved in the neuroendocrine response to stress. Brain control of the synthesis and secretion of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is mediated by neurohormones released from the hypothalamus at the base of the brain and transported by the hypophysial portal vessels to the anterior pituitary gland. The function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ACTH module is regulated by negative feedback by glucocorticoids secreted by the adrenal glands in response to ACTH stimulation.

Neuroendocrine systems and the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) precursor proopiomelanocortin, in particular, provided some of the first models for our understanding of gene transcription, translation and posttranslational processing in vertebrates. These and other principles related to neurotransmitter/neurohormone synthesis, release, mode of action, and control are being studied by researchers.

Neuroendocrinology is the study of the reciprocal actions between the nervous and the endocrine system. These interactions include the biological systems of the cells involved and the physiological processes of the human body. The neuroendocrine system is the mechanism where the hypothalamus maintains homeostasis, regulating reproduction, metabolism, energy utilization and hypertension.

What Foods Are Good For The Endocrine System?

The endocrine system also requires numerous vitamins and minerals to function properly, so a healthy endocrine diet should be rich in fruits and vegetables. Leafy greens, such as spinach, broccoli, turnip greens, kale, and asparagus, are especially good for endocrine health.

Polyphenols are reducing agents, and together with other dietary reducing agents, such as vitamin C, vitamin E and carotenoids, referred to as antioxidants, protect the body’s tissues against oxidative stress and associated pathologies such as cancers, coronary heart disease and inflammation.

Focus on eating fruits, vegetables, and quality protein. Along with healthy fats, amino acids found in protein are major building blocks for hormones. Eggs, fish, and lean meats are great sources of protein, as are quinoa, oats, beans, lentils, nuts, and Brussels sprouts.

You can support your endocrine system with what you eat. Avoid or eliminate processed foods, sugar, and unhealthy fats in your diet. Simple sugars interfere with the body’s insulin levels and can damage the pancreas. Processed foods often contain chemicals that act similarly to the body’s hormones, confusing the body and creating resistance to real hormones. Fats are the building blocks for many hormones and are a necessary part of your diet, but unhealthy fats can increase your risk of heart disease and cause impaired endocrine function. Instead, stick to healthy fats such as coconut oil, avocado, chia seeds, nuts, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds.

The endocrine system also requires numerous vitamins and minerals to function properly, so a healthy endocrine diet should be rich in fruits and vegetables. Leafy greens, such as spinach, broccoli, turnip greens, kale, and asparagus, are especially good for endocrine health.

Increasing evidence suggests that food ingested polyphenols can have beneficial effects in neuronal protection acting against oxidative stress and inflammatory injury. Moreover, polyphenols have been reported to promote cognitive functions. Biotransformation of polyphenols is needed to obtain metabolites active in the brain and it occurs through their processing by gut microbiota. Polyphenols metabolites could directly act as neurotransmitters crossing the blood-brain barrier or indirectly by modulating the cerebrovascular system. The microbiota-gut-brain axis is considered a neuroendocrine system that acts bidirectionally and plays an important role in stress responses.

The metabolites produced by microbiota metabolism can modulate gut bacterial composition and brain biochemistry acting as neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Gut microbiota composition can be influenced by dietary ingestion of natural bioactive molecules such as probiotics, prebiotics and polyphenol. Microbiota composition can be altered by dietary changes and gastrointestinal dysfunctions are observed in neurodegenerative diseases.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: https://www.sciencedirect.com, https://www.omicsonline.org/journal-neuroendocrinology-research.php, https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/neuroendocrinology, https://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/neuroendocrine/neuroendocrine-tumours/the-neuroendocrine-system/?region=on, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov,

Understanding The Endocrine System and How To Keep It Energetic and Healthy

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of "Slight Edge Performance Program" LLC
Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founders& President of “Slight Edge Performance” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Endocrine System?

The endocrine system is a chemical messenger system comprising feedback loops of the hormones released by internal glands of an organism directly into the circulatory system, regulating distant target organs. In humans, the major endocrine glands are the thyroid gland and the adrenal glands.

The endocrine system is the collection of glands that produce hormones that regulate metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and mood, among other things.

The endocrine system is a series of glands that produce and secrete hormones that the body uses for a wide range of functions. These control many different bodily functions, including:

  • Respiration
  • Metabolism
  • Reproduction
  • Sensory perception
  • Movement
  • Sexual development
  • Growth

Hormones are produced by glands and sent into the bloodstream to the various tissues in the body. They send signals to those tissues to tell them what they are supposed to do. When the glands do not produce the right amount of hormones, diseases develop that can affect many aspects of life.

The study of psychology and the endocrine system is called behavioral endocrinology, which is the scientific study of the interaction between hormones and behavior. This interaction is bidirectional: hormones can influence behavior, and behavior can sometimes influence hormone concentrations. Hormones regulate behaviors such as aggression, mating, and parenting of individuals. 

Hormones are involved in regulating all sorts of bodily functions, and they are ultimately controlled through interactions between the hypothalamus (in the central nervous system) and the pituitary gland (in the endocrine system). Imbalances in hormones are related to a number of disorders. This section explores some of the major glands that make up the endocrine system and the hormones secreted by these glands.

Major Glands of The Endocrine System

Major Glands

The pituitary gland descends from the hypothalamus at the base of the brain, and acts in close association with it. The pituitary is often referred to as the “master gland” because its messenger hormones control all the other glands in the endocrine system, although it mostly carries out instructions from the hypothalamus. In addition to messenger hormones, the pituitary also secretes growth hormone, endorphins for pain relief, and a number of key hormones that regulate fluid levels in the body.

Located in the neck, the thyroid gland releases hormones that regulate growth, metabolism, and appetite. In hyperthyroidism, or Grave’s disease, the thyroid secretes too much of the hormone thyroxine, causing agitation, bulging eyes, and weight loss. In hypothyroidism, reduced hormone levels cause sufferers to experience tiredness, and they often complain of feeling cold. Fortunately, thyroid disorders are often treatable with medications that help reestablish a balance in the hormones secreted by the thyroid.

The adrenal glands sit atop our kidneys and secrete hormones involved in the stress response, such as epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline). The pancreas is an internal organ that secretes hormones that regulate blood sugar levels: insulin and glucagon. These pancreatic hormones are essential for maintaining stable levels of blood sugar throughout the day by lowering blood glucose levels (insulin) or raising them (glucagon). People who suffer from diabetes do not produce enough insulin; therefore, they must take medications that stimulate or replace insulin production, and they must closely control the amount of sugars and carbohydrates they consume.

The gonads secrete sexual hormones, which are important in reproduction, and mediate both sexual motivation and behavior. The female gonads are the ovaries; the male gonads are the testis. Ovaries secrete estrogens and progesterone, and the testes secrete androgens, such as testosterone.

Glands that compose the endocrine system include the adrenals, ovaries/testes, pancreas, thyroid, parathyroid, and kidneys. These glands are influenced by the pituitary gland in the brain. When abnormalities occur, illness or death can result.

Biopsychology of The Endocrine System Hormones

The pituitary gland is sometimes known as the master gland because the hormones released by the pituitary gland control and stimulate the release of hormones from other glands in the endocrine system. The pituitary gland is also divided into the anterior (front) and posterior (rear) lobes (see right), which release different hormones. 

A key hormone released from the posterior lobe is oxytocin (often referred to as the ‘love hormone’) which is responsible for uterus contractions during childbirth. A key hormone released from the anterior lobe is adrenocortical trophic hormone (ACTH) which stimulates the adrenal cortex and the release of cortisol, during the stress response.

The main hormone released from the pineal gland is melatonin, which is responsible for important biological rhythms, including the sleep-wake cycle.

The thyroid gland releases thyroxine which is responsible for regulating metabolism. People who have a fast metabolism typically struggle to put on weight, as metabolism is involved in the chemical process of converting food into energy.

The adrenal gland is divided into two parts, the adrenal medulla and the adrenal cortex. The adrenal medulla is responsible for releasing adrenaline and noradrenaline, which play a key role in the fight or flight response. The adrenal cortex releases cortisol, which stimulates the release of glucose to provide the body with energy while suppressing the immune system.

Males and females have different sex organs, and in males the testes release androgens, which include the main hormone testosterone. Testosterone is responsible for the development of male sex characteristics during puberty while also promoting muscle growth. In females, the ovaries release oestrogen which controls the regulation of the female reproductive system, including the menstrual cycle and pregnancy.

Keeping Endocrine System Energetic and Healthy

Food is Medicine
You can start to heal your endocrine system through nutrition. The phrase “you are what you eat” rings true. The basic dietary approach goes back to understanding that all hormones are made from cholesterol, so avoid low fat diets and consume good healthy fats that are rich in omega fats. It is well studied that eating a diet rich in varied, colorful veggies will give your body the nutrients and nutrition that it needs to function properly and to prevent cancer. An example is dark green leafy veggies are packed full of B vitamins, essential nutrients when you are under stress.

Your body also needs Vitamin C, which is found in the green leaves, oranges, mango, parsley, broccoli, and cabbage. Vitamin C prevents free radical damage, strengthens and maintains healthy cell integrity, improves wound healing, enhances immune function, inhibits cancer formation, and lower inflammation. Natural carotenes, the orange pigment found in carrots, sweet potatoes, and cantaloupe aid balance by promoting healthy differentiation of cells, is a potent antioxidant, and enhances the immune system. And the constituent in green tea, epigallocatachin-3-gallate, stops free radical damage and lowers inflammation.

Fish can also be a good source of Omega 3 fatty acids, which play an important role in endocrine system health. The endocrine system also requires numerous vitamins and minerals to function properly, so a healthy endocrine diet should be rich in fruits and vegetables. Leafy greens, such as spinach, broccoli, turnip greens, kale, and asparagus, are especially good for endocrine health.

Other foods that support a healthy endocrine system Foods include lean protein (think chicken breasts, eggs, and wild-caught fish); vegetables and most fruit; chia seeds, flaxseeds, and most nuts; olive oil and some other unsaturated oils and fats, like canola oil; and whole grains like buckwheat, brown rice, and quinoa.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: https://www.nawellness.com/balancing-the-endocrine-system-naturally/, https://www.tutor2u.net/psychology/reference/biopsychology-the-endocrine-system-hormones, https://courses.lumenlearning.com/waymaker-psychology/chapter/the-endocrine-system/, https://www.livescience.com/26496-endocrine-system.html,

Understanding The Autonomic Nervous System and How To Keep it Energetic and Healthy

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Autonomic Nervous System?

The autonomic nervous system is the part of the nervous system that supplies the internal organs, including the blood vessels, stomach, intestine, liver, kidneys, bladder, genitals, lungs, pupils, heart, and sweat, salivary, and digestive glands.

The autonomic nervous system has two main divisions: Sympathetic and Parasympathetic.

After the autonomic nervous system receives information about the body and external environment, it responds by stimulating body processes, usually through the sympathetic division, or inhibiting them, usually through the parasympathetic division.

An autonomic nerve pathway involves two nerve cells. One cell is located in the brain stem or spinal cord. It is connected by nerve fibers to the other cell, which is located in a cluster of nerve cells (called an autonomic ganglion). Nerve fibers from these ganglia connect with internal organs. Most of the ganglia for the sympathetic division are located just outside the spinal cord on both sides of it. The ganglia for the parasympathetic division are located near or in the organs they connect with.

2 Divisions of Autonomic System: Sympathetic and Parasympathetic

1. The sympathetic nervous system

The sympathetic nervous system makes up part of the autonomic nervous system, also known as the involuntary nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system directs the body’s rapid involuntary response to dangerous or stressful situations.

The autonomic nervous system functions to regulate the body’s unconscious actions. The sympathetic nervous system’s primary process is to stimulate the body’s fight-flight-or-freeze response. It is, however, constantly active at a basic level to maintain homeostasis homeodynamics.

The sympathetic nervous system operates through a series of interconnected neurons. Sympathetic neurons are frequently considered part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), although there are many that lie within the central nervous system (CNS).

2. The parasympathetic nervous system

The parasympathetic nervous system inhibits the body from overworking and restores the body to a calm and composed state. The parasympathetic nervous system relates to the part of the automatic nervous system that counterbalances the action of the sympathetic nerves. It consists of nerves arising from the brain and the lower end of the spinal cord and supplying the internal organs, blood vessels, and glands.

Body functions stimulated by the parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) include sexual arousal, salivation, lacrimation, urination, digestion, and defecation. The PSNS primarily uses acetylcholine as its neurotransmitter.

Sometimes called the rest and digest system, the parasympathetic system conserves energy as it slows the heart rate, increases intestinal and gland activity, and relaxes sphincter muscles in the gastrointestinal tract.

The Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is a very complex system of nerves in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves that reach out to the limbs and organs. The ANS can be divided into three main areas. The central (brain) portions of the ANS are found in the medulla oblogata in the lower brain stem, and also in the hypothalmus. The other two portions of the ANS are found in the peripheral nerves, including the Sympathetic Nervous System branch, and the Parasympathetic Nervous System branch.

The medulla oblongata is a part of the brain that regulates cardiac, respiratory, vasomotor control, as well as reflexes like coughing, sneezing, vommitting and swallowing. The hypothalmus, another part of the brain, performs a supporting role by linking the nervous system to the endocrine system. The hypothalmus regulates body temperature, thirst, hunger, sleep and circadian rythyms in the body. Through endocrine control, the hypothamlus also plays a role in regulating blood volume and blood pressure.

The Sympathetic Nervous System is commonly associated with the “fight or flight” responses – those bodily reactions that you need to respond quickly in an emergency. When faced with a life threatening situation, your human instinct takes over and you either fight the danger you are facing, or you take flight and run away from the danger. Your Sympathetic Nervous System allows your body to do this rapidly. For example, in the face of danger, your Sympathetic Nervous system will cause bronchial dilation – this allows you to breathe better while you are fighting or running away from the dangerous situation. Likewise, your heart will beat stronger and faster, also prepping the body to fight or take flight.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System is commonly associated with the “rest and digest” responses – those bodily actions needed to restore energy and rest the body. For example, chewing food triggers the Parasympathetic Nervous System to increase production of saliva and to increase digestion in the gut. The Parasympathetic Nervous System also increases gallbladder function, which assists in the digestive process.

Why is it important to have a healthy nervous system?

The nervous system plays a role in nearly every aspect of our health and well-being. It guides everyday activities such as waking up; automatic activities such as breathing; and complex processes such as thinking, reading, remembering, and feeling emotions. The nervous system controls: Brain growth and development.

The nervous consists of the brain, the spinal cord, and neurons. It is arguably the most important system of the body. Two of the primary components of the central nervous system are the brain and the spinal cord.

The nervous system takes in information through our senses, processes the information and triggers reactions, such as making your muscles move or causing you to feel pain.

The nervous system is a complex collection of nerves and specialized cells known as neurons that transmit signals between different parts of the body. The somatic system consists of nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord with muscles and sensory receptors in the skin.


How do we keep our nervous system healthy?

Eat a balanced diet. A balanced, low-fat diet with ample sources of vitamins B6, B12, and folate will help protect the nervous system. Make sure that your diet contains lots of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Drink plenty of water and other fluids.

Get blood sugar and high blood pressure under control. Drink plenty of water and other fluids, as dehydration is not good for the nervous system.

Here are the top 10 ways to strengthen your nervous system

1. Deep Breathing
Deep breathing is a simple yet effective technique to deal with a weak nervous system. It can help you relax and reduce stress.

2. Walking Barefoot
Walking barefoot on moist earth, soft grass or a sandy beach for about 30 minutes daily can greatly benefit your nervous system and overall health. When you walk barefoot, the Earth’s surface electrons transfer into your body, promoting physiological changes and improved health.

3. Sunlight
Sunlight helps regulate the nervous system by helping the body produce vitamin D.

Expose your body to early morning sunlight without using any sunscreen for 10 to 15 minutes daily to boost your vitamin D levels. You can also get vitamin D from salmon, tuna, milk, eggs and fortified breakfast cereals.

4. Yoga and Mediation
You can make yoga and meditation, a part of your daily routine to strengthen your nervous system. The combination of three elements of yoga, such as poses meditation and proper breathing practice helps strengthen the peripheral nervous system. Furthermore, yoga is good for elevating mood, reducing cortisol level, boosting the immune system and increasing overall physical and mental well-being. As it is essential to do yoga poses in a proper manner, learn the poses from an expert and then practice them daily.

5. Magnesium
Magnesium is an important mineral for a healthy nervous system. The deficiency of this mineral has an inhibitory effect on several neurotransmitters that support signal transmission between nerve cells. Furthermore, it aids the body’s production of serotonin, which relaxes the nervous system and elevates mood. It even promotes muscle relaxation.

6. Omega-3 Fatty Acids
To reduce the risk of a weak nervous system, start eating foods rich in omega-3. Omega-3 fatty acids are important for the development and functioning of the central nervous system. These fatty acids are necessary for proper neuron functioning and improved nerve transmissions.

7. Exercise
Regular exercise is also important for strengthening the nervous system. Walking, running, jogging, swimming, and bicycling are some exercises that can be helpful in keeping the nervous system healthy. You can always talk to your doctor about exercises that will be right for you.

8. Epsom Salt
An Epsom salt bath is also good for your nervous system. It helps muscles and nerves function properly. The magnesium in it also helps increase the mood-elevating serotonin in the brain, which reduces stress and promotes relaxation.

9. Green Tea
Green tea also has a positive impact on your nervous system. L-theanine, the amino acid in green tea, helps increase levels of dopamine and serotonin. This in turn improves mood and reduces stress. Furthermore, the caffeine in green tea helps increase alertness, focus, concentration and thinking ability. Also, the antioxidants in it benefit the cardiovascular autonomic nervous system and reduce the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

10. Chamomile
Chamomile is a popular herb that can be used as a mild sedative to calm nerves and reduce anxiety. It can even treat hysteria, nightmares, insomnia and other sleep problems.

Additional Tips

  • Do not smoke or use other tobacco products.
  • Get plenty of rest and sleep after a long, hectic day.
  • Get blood sugar and high blood pressure under control.
  • Drink plenty of water and other fluids, as dehydration is not good for the nervous system.
  • Limit your intake of caffeinated as well as alcoholic drinks.
  • End a bath with a few seconds of a cold shower to stimulate your nervous system. However, avoid the head region.
  • Do not use non-prescribed medicines.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: https://painendshere.com/how-to-strengthen-your-nervous-system/, http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org, https://www.merckmanuals.com, https://www.elitecme.com/resource-center/nursing/improving-endocrine-health-through-a-healthy-diet/,

Understanding The Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) Axis and How To Keep It Energetic and Healthy

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Hypothalamus-Pituitary- Adrenal (HPA)- Axis?

The hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis is our central stress response system. The HPA axis is an eloquent and every-dynamic intertwining of the central nervous system and endocrine system.

The HPA axis is responsible for the neuroendocrine adaptation component of the stress response. This response is characterized by hypothalamic release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), also called corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), is a peptide hormone that activates the synthesis and release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland.

What Is Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH)?

Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; also adrenocorticotropin, corticotropin) is a polypeptide tropic hormone produced by and secreted by the anterior pituitary gland. It is also used as a medication and diagnostic agent.

Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is a hormone produced in the anterior, or front, pituitary gland in the brain. The function of ACTH is to regulate levels of the steroid hormone cortisol, which released from the adrenal gland.

What Is The Importance Of The Pituitary Gland?

The Pituitary Gland is the major endocrine gland. A pea-sized body attached to the base of the brain, the pituitary is important in controlling growth and development and the functioning of the other endocrine glands.

The pituitary gland is a part of your endocrine system. Its main function is to secrete hormones into your bloodstream. These hormones can affect other organs and glands, especially your adrenal glands.

Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) | Lab Tests Online

Why Is Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Important?

Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is made in the pituitary gland. It is needed for your adrenal glands to work properly and help your body react to stress. ACTH stimulates the release of another hormone called cortisol from the cortex (outer part) of the adrenal gland.

Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is released from the hypothalamus which stimulates the anterior pituitary to release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). ACTH then acts on its target organ, the adrenal cortex.

Why Is The Hypothalamus Gland Important?

The hypothalamus is a small but important area in the center of the brain. It plays an important role in hormone production and helps to stimulate many important processes in the body and is located in the brain, between the pituitary gland and thalamus.

The hypothalamus links the nervous and endocrine systems by way of the pituitary gland. Its function is to secrete releasing hormones and inhibiting hormones that stimulate or inhibit production of hormones in the anterior pituitary.

Its overall role is to collect and integrate a huge variety of information from the body and to organize neural and endocrine responses that maintain homeostasis (constant internal environment).

The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain that contains a number of small nuclei with a variety of functions. One of the most important functions of the hypothalamus is to link the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland.

The hypothalamusmain role is to keep the body in homeostasis as much as possible. Homeostasis means a healthful, balanced bodily state.

What Is The Adrenal Gland?

The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can’t live without, including sex hormones and cortisol. Cortisol helps you respond to stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough hormones.

Adrenal glands produce hormones that help regulate your metabolism, immune system, blood pressure, response to stress and other essential functions. Adrenal glands are composed of two parts — the cortex and the medulla — which are each responsible for producing different hormones.

The adrenal glands (also known as suprarenal glands) are endocrine glands that produce a variety of hormones including adrenaline and the steroids aldosterone and cortisol. They are found above the kidneys. Each gland has an outer cortex which produces steroid hormones and an inner medulla.

You have two adrenal glands. They’re located on top of each of your kidneys. They’re part of your endocrine system, a collection of glands that produce hormones.

You have one triangular-shaped adrenal gland at the top of each kidney. Each adrenal gland contains an outer adrenal cortex. It’s responsible for producing certain steroid hormones, including aldosterone and cortisol. Each gland also contains an inner adrenal medulla, which produces several other hormones, including adrenaline and noradrenaline.

Aldosterone helps control your blood pressure by managing the balance of potassium and sodium in your body. Cortisol works in conjunction with adrenaline and noradrenaline to help regulate your reaction to stress. Cortisol also helps regulate your metabolism, sugar levels, and blood pressure.

Your adrenal glands are controlled by your pituitary gland, another part of your endocrine system. Located in your head, your pituitary gland is the main controller of your endocrine glands. Abnormal signals can disrupt the amount of hormones that your pituitary gland tells your adrenal glands to produce. This can cause them to produce too little or too much hormone. Hormonal imbalances can result, causing a variety of symptoms and health problems.

How Can I Improve My HPA Axis?

Foods with high omega-3 content include fish, walnuts, flax seeds, and leafy vegetables. Additional healthy dietary choices to support the hypothalamus and optimal brain function include vitamin-rich fruits and vegetables.

The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a set of three systems that encompass the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and adrenal gland. Working together, the HPA axis supports a number of important functions within the body, including the stress response, metabolism, immunity, mood and emotions, and digestion

Our Food as Medicine Approach

Choose whole grain, high fiber, and minimally refined forms of carbohydrates. Whenever you eat a food higher in carbohydrates, such as fruit, crackers, bread, rice, potatoes, etc ALWAYS pair it with a food that contains protein and/or fat. This is essential for a slower release of glucose (sugar) into our bloodstream, which will help keep blood sugar levels stable.

Inflammation is a common characteristic with adrenal fatigue and having a solid anti-inflammatory eating plan is essential to reduce the inflammation. Eat a wide variety of colorful fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. These foods provide phytonutrients, such as carotenoids, resveratrol, and flavonoids that have both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. 

The adrenal glands are involved in our body’s stress response. Integrating stress management techniques into your daily routine will help your body naturally regulate cortisol levels and support healthy HPA axis and adrenal function. Try a daily meditation, gentle movement, deep breathing, calming music, and/or journaling.

Nutrition is the foundation for proper hormone production and optimal function, as it provides the building blocks to create and activate our hormones. To support healthy adrenal hormones, we need the right amounts of amino acids, B vitamins, vitamin C, and magnesium. Aim to include the following foods in your meals at least a few times each week. 

  • Protein: fish, meats, legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains
  • Folate: green leafy vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, oranges
  • Niacin (B3): dairy foods, eggs, nuts and seeds, corn, lean meats and fish
  • Pantothenic Acid B5: cremini and shitake mushrooms, cauliflower, avocado, broccoli, sweet potato, corn, and many other vegetables
  • Vitamin C: many fruits and vegetables, citrus fruits, bell peppers, strawberries, melons, spinach, cabbage, rose hips
  • Magnesium: legumes, green vegetables, quinoa and other whole grains, nuts and seeds

Food and nutrition play such an important role in the development and prevention of disease and therefore enjoy your journey as you discover the power of food as medicine.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: https://www.frontiersin.org, https://mplsimc.com/2019/07/03/nutrition-approach-for-adrenal-fatigue/, https://www.elitecme.com, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

The 7 Chakras and How They Influence Balanced Health

Domonique D. Hargrove, B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Are The 7 Chakras?

There are seven chakras. The Root Chakra, located as the base of the spine, which represents our foundation and grounding. The Sacral Chakra, located in the lower abdomen, which represents creativity, passion, intimacy, and connection. The Solar Plexus Chakra, located in the upper abdomen, which represents self-worth, confidence, and the power of transformation. The Heart Chakra, located in the center of the chest, represents love, forgiveness, inner peace, and joy. The Throat Chakra, located in the throat, represents communication and expression. The Third Eye Chakra, located between the eyes on the forehead, represents imagination, intelligence, and trust. The Crown Chakra, located at the top of the head, represents oneness, spirituality, and connectivity.

1. Root Chakra ( Muladhara Chakra): Muladhara or the root chakra is one of the seven primary chakras according to Hindu tantrism. It is symbolized by a lotus with four petals and the colour red. The muladhara chakra is located at the perineum, the space between the anal outlet and the genital organ. This the most basic chakra in the body.

Mulaadhaar means foundation. The muladhara chakra is the foundation of the physical structure and the energy body. Having a stable foundation is very important. Unless the muladhara is stabilized, one will not know health, wellbeing, and a sense of stability and completeness. These qualities are essential for a human being to make an effort to climb high.

2. Sacral Chakra (Svadhisthana): The word ‘Svadhisthana‘ is derived from two Sanskrit words, ‘Swa’ and ‘Adhisthana’ where swa means ‘one’s own’ and ‘adhisthana’ means abode or seat. Therefore, the word literally means ‘one’s own abode’ though there is another meaning of ‘swad’ in Sanskrit i.e. ‘take pleasure in.’

The second chakra is our passion and pleasure center and governs our emotions, senses, intimacy, creativity, and connection. A balanced second chakra allows us to express our creativity, form deep, intimate relationships, and pursue our passions. An imbalanced sacral chakra can lead to many disturbances, including commitment issues, stifled creativity, lack of drive, lack of confidence, depression, back pain, and urinary/reproductive issues.

3. Solar Plexus (Manipura chakra): In the solar plexus area (upper part of the belly, where your diaphragm rests); it is the third chakra from the bottom in the traditional system counting 7 chakras. The most commonly accepted location for the third chakra is at the solar plexus level, between the navel and the lower part of the chest. That’s why it’s often referred to as the “solar plexus chakra.” 

The main function of this energy center is to provide actual momentum to move forward and realize personal desires and intentions in the world. It plays a fundamental role in the development of personal power. It feeds one’s direction in life and the actions taken in order to reach your goals. It influences preoccupations about social status and self-image.

4. Heart chakra (Anahata): Anahata or heart chakra is the fourth primary chakra, according to Hindu Yogic, Shakta and Buddhist Tantric traditions. In Sanskrit, anahata means “unhurt, unstruck, and unbeaten”. “Anahata Nad” refers to the Vedic concept of unstruck sound. Anahata is associated with balance, calmness, and serenity. The anahata chakra is associated with unconditional love, compassion, and joy. It is the source of deep and profound truths that cannot be expressed in words. Anahata is a bridge between the lower and upper chakras integrating the manifest with the spiritual.

On the physical level, the heart is associated with the organs heart and lungs and in the polar nature of these organs a strong symbolic meaning can be found: The space of the heart chakra is beyond polarity, beyond inhaling or exhaling, beyond tension and relaxation; it is the space holding them all. Through the heart chakra, we connect to the unconditional love of unity, which underlies all phenomena. Invisible as the air, which is the element of this chakra, the unity behind all things finally becomes tangible for us.

5. Throat Chakra (Vishuddha chakra): Vishuddha chakra, the communication chakra located at the throat, is associated with the color blue and with the space element. The qualities of this chakra are communication, truth, and self-expression. Vishuddha governs not only our communication with others, but also our own internal communication—with our own self, and with our higher power.

The gland associated with Vishuddha is the thyroid, which regulates metabolism and affects physical and mental development. When this chakra is in balance we are able to tune in and listen to the guidance of our higher self. We are able to truly find our inner truth, and to communicate and live our truth in daily life. A balanced Vishuddha chakra allows us to easily communicate with others, and to be honest with ourselves.

To successfully reach and open the fifth chakra, the body must attain a certain level of purification which helps to achieve sensitivity needed for the subtler upper chakras. Purification is attained through diet, yoga, meditation, and exercise. As we move up the chakras, balancing each one, Vishuddha chakra becomes easier to work with as it builds from a stable, balanced base.

6. Ajna Chakra (Third Eye Chakra): The 6th Chakra, or the Third Eye Chakra (in Sanskrit, Ājñā, which means “Command” or “monitoring center”), is located in the forehead above the meeting point of the two eyebrows. Its main colour is purple, and the element it is associated with is light. It is the Chakra of perception and discrimination.

The Third Eye Chakra can be considered the “mother” of the 7 Chakras. While all other Chakras provide and produce different instincts, impulses, wills, feelings, emotions and experiences, the Third Eye Chakra is supposed to be the one supervising them all. It is really the eye of the soul, the Seer, the centre of presence and perception, the omega point in which all the others chakras impressions are being perceived. For this reason, it has also been called the “Seat of the Soul”. Its location in the centre of the brain reflects this central role.

The pineal gland is small gland in the brain located near the center of the brain. It sits between the two hemispheres where the two halves of the thalamus join.

The pineal gland, also known as the third eye, or Ajna Chakra, is thought to be the organ of spiritual insight. It is that part of the brain associated with the flow of attention in an inward direction. In healing the self, we want the attention to flow inward.

In Energy Work, we see the body as an antenna, a receptor for flows of knowledge or information. The pineal gland, in particular, is a great antenna for receiving these downloads of knowledge.

Cognitions enter through the crown and light up pineal gland which receives the download which, in turn, creates waves. These waves, or channels of consciousness, flow in various directions and become like strings that start to hum.

7. Crown Chakra (Sahasrara Chakra): Known as Sahasrara in Sanskrit, Crown (Sahasrara) Chakra is the top Chakra of the seven Chakras and is a thousand-petalled Lotus at the crown of the head. It is our link to the universe that tunes us to the highest form of consciousness and the Divine. It is our basis of illumination and spiritual connection, to our higher sense. Expression of gratitude is the life lesson that this Chakra teaches us. It represents Infinite wisdom. The opening of this Chakra points to the realization of pure awareness that leads to divine communion with the world.

A person with a balanced Crown (Sahasrara) Chakra is graced with an ever expanding self-realization, self-awareness and self-reflection that empower them to stand out in the crowd as they are freed from the shackles of desire. When this Crown (Sahasrara) Chakra is blocked it results in harmful and unhelpful thoughts that originate from the lack of direction and the resentment that the divine powers have abandoned you.

If you meet a person with a magnetic personality, someone who can achieve “miracles” in life, you know that you are standing in the presence of a person with a balanced crown chakra. You will find that knowing has replaced beliefs, as the crown is where we hold on to our belief system. An awakened crown chakra person will question any and all of our beliefs, constantly expanding the level of self-awareness and self- reflection. They also have the ability to surrender to their love for all life and the divine; they are at peace with themselves.

Eating To Keep Chakras Energetic and Healthy

Emotionally, the root chakra is linked to financial independence, money, and food. A block in the root chakra might manifest by feelings of burnout, fatigue, or a lack of motivation. To stimulate the root chakra, reach for vibrant crimson foods such as beets, strawberries, radishes, tomatoes, and chilies.

Balance your sacral chakra with all things orange. Think carrots, mango, oranges, orange peppers, peaches, apricots, and sweet potatoes. Foods rich in Omega-3s, such as salmon, also work well to balance this chakra. Nuts and seeds such as flax, almonds, walnuts, and sesame provide additional fatty Omega-3s, which aid in cardiovascular health and reduce inflammation.

Like the chakra’s color, think yellow when it comes to balancing your solar plexus. Bananas, pineapple, corn, lemons, and yellow curry. Yellow is a natural mood enhancer. Also feed this chakra with complex carbohydrates and whole grains such as oats, brown rice, spelt, rye, farro, beans, vegetables, and sprouted grains. These foods provide crucial fiber and sustainable energy.

Balance your fifth chakra with blue foods. Blueberries and blackberries are particularly good sources of fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins. For the throat chakra, think healing and soothing foods and liquids such as coconut water, herbal teas, raw honey, and lemon. Fruit that grows on trees such as apples, pears, and plums are also known to be excellent at healing this chakra.

Think purple for the sixth chakra or the brow chakra. Purple grapes, purple kale, blueberries, purple cabbage, eggplant, and purple carrots. Also include cocao, which is rich in flavonoids and boosts serotonin, which helps to relieve stress and inflammation. These “brain foods” can instantly help clear an overworked mind and help to regain focus.

The crown chakra focuses more on fasting and detoxing than it does on food. It focuses more on the spiritual aspect of our bodies; our minds. Detoxing can help our bodies flush out toxins, boost our energy, and clear our mind. Meditation and yoga is an excellent way to strengthen and heal the crown chakra. It can teach us to live mindfully and take some quiet, peaceful time for ourselves amidst our chaotic lives. Meditation herbs or essential oils such as sage, lavender, frankincense, and juniper are wonderful in balancing this chakra.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: http://www.chakrayog.com, https://7wisdoms.org/chakras/third-eye-chakra/, https://www.theyogasanctuary.biz, https://www.distanceenergywork.com, https://www.parsnipsandpastries.com,

Understanding The 7 Chakras and Their Impact on Balanced Health

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What is a Chakra?

Chakra means wheel in sanskrit and indicate that energy moves through us in spiral wheel vortexes and come to life due to junction points called nadis (energy channels) where so called prana, life force, merge.

Chakra are various focal points used in a variety of ancient meditation practices, collectively denominated as Tantra, or the esoteric or inner traditions of Hinduism. The concept is found in the early traditions of Hinduism.

The Sanskrit word Chakra literally translates to wheel or disk. In yoga, meditation, and Ayurveda, this term refers to wheels of energy throughout the body. There are seven main chakras, which align the spine, starting from the base of the spine through to the crown of the head. To visualize a chakra in the body, imagine a swirling wheel of energy where matter and consciousness meet. This invisible healing energy, called Prana, is vital life force, which keeps us vibrant, healthy, and alive.

What is Prana?

Prana comes into the body from the food we eat, the air we breathe, and from absorbing the energies of the earth and the heavens. Prana travels through thousands of tiny channels called nadis to every cell in the body.

In Hindu philosophy including yoga, Indian medicine and Indian martial arts, prana (prāṇa; the Sanskrit word for breath, “life force”, or “vital principle”) permeates reality on all levels including inanimate objects.

Prana regulates all physical functions for example, the breath, the supply of oxygen, digestion, elimination and much more. The function of the human body is much like a transformer, receiving energy from the Universal flow of Prana, distributing that energy, and then eliminating it.

What Is Pranayama?

“Prana” is Breath or bio energy in the body. Therefore, Pranayama is “Control of Breath”. One can control the rhythms of pranic energy with pranayama and achieve healthy body and mind. In yoga, Pranayama is basically series of exercises, which aims at bringing more oxygen to blood and to the brain.

Pranayama is the practice of controlling the breath and lies at the heart of yoga. It has a mysterious power to soothe and revitalize a tired body, a flagging spirit, or a wild mind. The ancient sages taught that prana, the vital force circulating through us, can be cultivated and channeled through a collection of breathing exercises.

In the process, the mind is calmed, rejuvenated, and uplifted. Pranayama serves as an important bridge between the outward, active practices of yoga—like asana—and the internal, surrendering practices that lead us into deeper states of meditation.

What Are The Seven Major Chakras?

Chakra is a Sanskrit word and it means “Wheel” or “Vortex” because that is what it looks like when we look at it. Each Chakra is like a solid ball of energy interpenetrating the physical body, in the same way, that a magnetic field can interpenetrate the physical body.

The Chakras are not physical, they are the aspects of consciousness in the same way that the Auras are aspects of consciousness. The Chakras are denser than the Auras but not as dense as the physical body.

Chakras interact with the physical body through two major vehicles, the endocrine system and the nervous system. Each of the seven main Chakras discussed here are associated with one of the seven endocrine glands and also with a particular group of nerves called a Plexus.

Each of these Chakras can be associated with particular parts of the body and particular functions within the body controlled by that Plexus or that endocrine gland associated with that Chakra.

Chakras are the circular vortexes of energy that are placed in seven different points on the spinal column, and all the seven chakras are connected to the various organs and glands within the body. These chakras are responsible for disturbing the life energy, which is also known as Chi or Prana.

1. Muladhara or the root chakra is one of the seven primary chakras according to Hindu tantrism. It is symbolized by a lotus with four petals and the color red. Muladhara is located near the coccygeal plexus beneath the sacrum, while its superficial activation or non-physical point, is located between the perineum and the coccyx or the pelvic bone. Because of its location and connection with the act of excretion, it is associated with the anus.

Root chakra—Mūlādhāra is the chakra of stability, security, and our basic needs. The root chakra is comprised of whatever grounds you to stability in your life. This includes your basic needs such as food, water, shelter, safety, as well as your emotional needs of interconnection, and being fearless.

2. Svadhisthana or the sacral chakra, is the second primary chakra according to Hindu Tantrism. This chakra is said to be blocked by fear, especially the fear of death. The energy of the second chakra, also known as the sacral chakra or Svadhisthana, is the power of partnerships, how we begin to relate to others outside the family tribe, the creative exploration of life and relationships, sexuality, and discovering the power of choice.

The location for the sacral chakra is about three inches below the navel, at the center of your lower belly. In the back, it’s located at the level of the lumbar vertebrae. It is associated with the lymphatic system. The sacral chakra is associated with the realm of emotions. It’s the center of our feelings and sensations. It’s particularly active in our sexuality and the expression of our sensual and sexual desires.

3. The Solar Plexus, or Manipura, refers to the third chakra. It spins in the area around the abdomen above the belly button up to the breastbone. Meaning “lustrous gem” in Sanskrit, the Manipura chakra provides a source of personal power and relates to self-esteem, warrior energy, and the power of transformation.

The third chakra is called Manipura, which means “lustrous gem.” Manipura is the original Sanskrit name for the Solar Plexus chakra. Located around the navel in the area of the solar plexus and up to the breastbone, it is a source of personal power and governs self-esteem, warrior energy, and the power of transformation. The Manipura chakra also controls metabolism and digestion.

4. Anahata or heart chakra is the fourth primary chakra, according to Hindu Yogic, Shakta and Buddhist Tantric traditions. The heart chakra is associated with compassion, affection, and love. The energy of the heart chakra starts in the center and expands through the chest. Motivated by love, your fourth chakra is responsible for moving love throughout your life.

The heart chakra, or Anahata in its original Sanskrit name, colors our life with compassion, love, and beauty. Driven by the principles of transformation and integration, the fourth energy center is said to bridge earthly and spiritual aspirations.

In the center of the chest (the energy center is not located where our actual heart organ lies; rather, the heart chakra is in the center of the chest area); it is the 4th chakra counting from the bottom of the spine in the traditional 7 chakra system.

5. The fifth chakra, the throat or Vishuddha chakra, sits in the area of the throat, jaw, neck, mouth, and thyroid. In Sanskrit, Vishuddha means “especially pure”. As the throat chakra governs the mouth, tongue, and neck, it relates to communication and your ability to understand and speak your inner truth “purely”.

The Throat chakra is the fifth chakra. Located at the center of the neck at the level of the throat, it is the passage of the energy between the lower parts of the body and the head. The function of the Throat chakra is driven by the principle of expression and communication.

Throat chakra (Vishuddha) is the fifth chakra of the spiritual body that located near the region of the throat and is associated with speech, hearing and communication. It helps in developing powerful communication skills, expressing yourself authentically without any doubt or fear, and generating the confidence to speak truth.

6. The Brow Chakra also called the third eye is the center of perception and command. It directs our sight and everyday awareness of the world. Our consciousness is located here. The most common Sanskrit name for the Third eye chakra is “Ajna”, which means “command” and “perceiving”. This chakra is related to the “supreme element”, which is the combination of all the elements in their pure form.

In yogic metaphysics, the third eye or Ajna chakra, is the center where we transcend duality – the duality of a personal “I” separate from the rest of the world, of a personality that exists independently from everything else.

The image of the Third Eye chakra symbol contains two elements frequently associated with wisdom: the upside down triangle and the lotus flower.

The most commonly accepted location for the sixth chakra is between the eyebrows, slightly above at the bridge of your nose. It can also be described as being located behind the eyes in the middle of the head. The Third eye chakra is associated to the pineal gland in charge of regulating biorhythms, including sleep and wake time.

It’s a gland located in the brain that is a center of attention because of its relationship with the perception and effect of light and altered or “mystical” states of consciousness. It’s positioned close to the optical nerves, and as such, sensitive to visual stimulations and changes in lighting.

7. The crown chakra is the seventh chakra. Located at the top of the head, it gives us access to higher states of consciousness as we open to what is beyond our personal preoccupations and visions. The function of the Crown chakra is driven by consciousness and gets us in touch with the universal.

The seventh chakra is referred to as: Crown chakra, Sahasrara, Shunnya, Niralambapuri. The Sanskrit name “Sahasrara” is sometimes used to designate the seventh chakra. It can be translated as “Thousand petals”.

The crown chakra is most commonly represented with the color white, although it can also be depicted as deep purple. The auric color of crown chakra energy can also be seen as gold, white, or clear light.

The most commonly accepted location for the seventh chakra is at the top of the head or slightly above the head. It sits like a crown, radiating upwards, hence its name.

The Crown chakra is primarily associated to the pituitary gland, and secondarily to the pineal and the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus and pituitary gland work in pair to regulate the endocrine system.  Because of its location, the crown chakra is closely associated with the brain and the whole nervous system.

Note that energetically, the seventh chakra has a connection with the first chakra, as they both are at the extremities of the chakra system.

Eating To Keep Chakras Energetic and Healthy

Emotionally, the root chakra is linked to financial independence, money, and food. A block in the root chakra might manifest by feelings of burnout, fatigue, or a lack of motivation. To stimulate the root chakra, reach for vibrant crimson foods such as beets, strawberries, radishes, tomatoes, and chilies.

Balance your sacral chakra with all things orange. Think carrots, mango, oranges, orange peppers, peaches, apricots, and sweet potatoes. Foods rich in Omega-3s, such as salmon, also work well to balance this chakra. Nuts and seeds such as flax, almonds, walnuts, and sesame provide additional fatty Omega-3s, which aid in cardiovascular health and reduce inflammation.

Like the chakra’s color, think yellow when it comes to balancing your solar plexus. Bananas, pineapple, corn, lemons, and yellow curry. Yellow is a natural mood enhancer. Also feed this chakra with complex carbohydrates and whole grains such as oats, brown rice, spelt, rye, farro, beans, vegetables, and sprouted grains. These foods provide crucial fiber and sustainable energy.

Balance your fifth chakra with blue foods. Blueberries and blackberries are particularly good sources of fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins. For the throat chakra, think healing and soothing foods and liquids such as coconut water, herbal teas, raw honey, and lemon. Fruit that grows on trees such as apples, pears, and plums are also known to be excellent at healing this chakra.

Think purple for the sixth chakra or the brow chakra. Purple grapes, purple kale, blueberries, purple cabbage, eggplant, and purple carrots. Also include cocao, which is rich in flavonoids and boosts serotonin, which helps to relieve stress and inflammation. These “brain foods” can instantly help clear an overworked mind and help to regain focus.

The crown chakra focuses more on fasting and detoxing than it does on food. It focuses more on the spiritual aspect of our bodies; our minds. Detoxing can help our bodies flush out toxins, boost our energy, and clear our mind. Meditation and yoga is an excellent way to strengthen and heal the crown chakra. It can teach us to live mindfully and take some quiet, peaceful time for ourselves amidst our chaotic lives. Meditation herbs or essential oils such as sage, lavender, frankincense, and juniper are wonderful in balancing this chakra.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

References: https://www.chakras.info, https://www.parsnipsandpastries.com, https://www.timothypope.co.uk/chakras-endocrine-system, https://chopra.com/articles, https://mindfulnessquest.com, https://ulricanorberg.se/chakras-what-are-they-actually/

How To Keep Your Central Nervous System Energetic and Healthy

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Central Nervous System?

The central nervous system (CNS) controls most functions of the body and mind. It consists of two parts: the brain and the spinal cord. The brain is the center of our thoughts, the interpreter of our external environment, and the origin of control over body movement.

The central nervous system is that part of the nervous system that consists of the brain and spinal cord. The other is the peripheral nervous system (PNS) which is outside the brain and spinal cord.

What Is The Peripheral Nervous System?

The peripheral nervous system (PNS) is the division of the nervous system containing all the nerves that lie outside of the central nervous system (CNS). The primary role of the PNS is to connect the CNS to the organs, limbs, and skin.

The main function of the PNS is to connect the central nervous system (CNS) to the limbs and organs, essentially serving as a relay between the brain and spinal cord and the rest of the body.

The peripheral nervous system is made up of nerves that branch off from the spinal cord and extend to all parts of the body.

Peripheral nervous system (PNS) is the portion of the nervous system that is outside the brain and spinal cord. The nerves in the PNS connect the central nervous system (CNS) to sensory organs, such as the eye and ear, and to other organs of the body, muscles, blood vessels, and glands.

What Is The Importance of The Central Nervous System?

The nervous system helps all the parts of the body to communicate with each other. It also reacts to changes both outside and inside the body. The nervous system uses both electrical and chemical means to send and receive messages.

The nervous system consists of the brain, spinal cord, sensory organs, and all of the nerves that connect these organs with the rest of the body. Together, these organs are responsible for the control of the body and communication among its parts.

The brain and spinal cord form the control center known as the central nervous system (CNS), where information is evaluated and decisions made. The sensory nerves and sense organs of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) monitor conditions inside and outside of the body and send this information to the CNS. Efferent nerves in the PNS carry signals from the control center to the muscles, glands, and organs to regulate their functions.

What are Efferent and Afferent nerves?

Neurons that receive information from our sensory organs (e.g. eye, skin) and transmit this input to the central nervous system are called afferent neurons. Neurons that send impulses from the central nervous system to your limbs and organs are called efferent neurons.

Afferent neurons are sensory neurons that carry nerve impulses from sensory stimuli towards the central nervous system and brain, while efferent neurons are motor neurons that carry neural impulses away from the central nervous system and towards muscles to cause movement.

Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) afferents are the axons (the long threadlike part of a nerve cell along which impulses are conducted from the cell body to other cells) of sensory neurons carrying sensory information from all over the body, into the spine. PNS efferents are the axons of spinal cord motor neurons that carry motor-movement signals out of the spine to the muscles.

How The Human Brain and Central Nervous System Connection Work?

The complexity of the central nervous system is amazing: there are approximately 100 billion neurons in the brain and spinal cord combined. As many as 10,000 different subtypes of neurons have been identified, each specialized to send and receive certain types of information.

The nervous system has two great divisions: 1. The central nervous system (CNS), which consists of the brain and the spinal cord, and 2. the peripheral nervous system (PNS), which consists of nerves and small concentrations of gray matter called ganglia. The brain sends messages via the spinal cord to the body’s peripheral nerves, which control the muscles and internal organs.

The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord. It is referred to as “central” because it combines information from the entire body and coordinates activity across the whole organism.

The spinal cord is the highway for communication between the body and the brain. When the spinal cord is injured, the exchange of information between the brain and other parts of the body is disrupted.

Each segment of the spinal cord receives sensory input from a particular region of the body. Scientists have mapped these areas and determined the “receptive” fields for each level of the spinal cord.

How To Heal, Protect and Strengthen Your Central Nervous System

A balanced, low-fat diet with ample sources of vitamins B6, B12, and folate will help protect the nervous system. Make sure that your diet contains lots of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Drink plenty of water and other fluids. This helps prevent dehydration, which can cause confusion and memory problems.

Green leafy vegetables. Green leafy vegetables are rich in Vitamin B complex, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Magnesium all of which are important for proper functioning of our nervous system.

Vitamin B is essential in the process of synthesizing and circulating neurotransmitters, which are brain chemicals that regulate heartbeat, respiration and digestion. Magnesium helps in calming the nerves. Vitamin E and C acts as anti-ageing for the nervous system.

Nerves are protected by myelin sheaths, which contain very high level of fatty acid. So, people who are deficient in fatty acids may suffer from damage of the nerves. Fish has Omega 3 fatty acid and thus helps in healing of the nerves and nervous system.

Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of magnesium, copper, iron, and zinc. Apart from all this, pumpkin seeds contain powerful antioxidants that protect the body and brain from free radical damage.

Almonds have high levels of brain-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and lots of brain-protecting vitamin E just like the salmon fish.

Rich in both Vitamin K and folate, avocados help prevent blood clot in the brain and thus protects you from stroke. Apart from that, avocados also help to improve memory and concentration. The best thing about avocados is they have the highest protein and lowest sugar content as compared to any other fruit.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack

Bringing you the best of nature and the best of science, Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack contains a variety of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients to seriously build your foundational nutrition.

Each daily serving contains:

  • Nutrilite™ Double X™ Multivitamin: The ultimate multivitamin with 22 vitamins and minerals and 22 plant concentrates helps fill nutrient gaps and provides antioxidant protection against free radicals.
  • Nutrilite™ Concentrated Fruits and Vegetables: Provides phytonutrients equal to 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • Nutrilite™ Balanced Health Omega: Provides DHA and EPA omega-3s to support brain and eye health.
  • Nutrilite™ Vitamin D: Helps calcium absorption for strong bones.

    To ORDER Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack email me at domonique.dhfitness@gmail.com

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

References: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com, https://www.brainfacts.org, http://www.christopherreeve.org,

Understanding Your Pineal Gland and Circadian Rhythm for Improved Sleep Health

Domonique D. Hargrove B.A., M.S., NCEP Certified Trainer, Founder& President of “Slight Edge Performance Program” LLC

Be sure to “like” and “follow” our Team Page facebook.com/SlightEdgePerformanceProgram

What Is The Circadian Rhythm?

A circadian rhythm is a natural, internal process that regulates the sleep-wake cycle and repeats roughly every 24 hours. It can refer to any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours.

Circadian rhythms are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a daily cycle. They respond primarily to light and darkness in an organism’s environment. Sleeping at night and being awake during the day is an example of a light-related circadian rhythm.

Circadian rhythm is the 24-hour internal clock in our brain that regulates cycles of alertness and sleepiness by responding to light changes in our environment. Our physiology and behavior are shaped by the Earth’s rotation around its axis.

Circadian rhythms are linked to your body’s internal clock and your sleep/wake cycle. Circadian rhythms are important in determining your natural sleeping and feeding patterns. Brain wave activity, hormone production, cell regeneration, and other important biological processes are determined by this cycle.

The circadian biological clock is controlled by a part of the brain called the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SCN), a group of cells in the hypothalamus that respond to light and dark signals. From the optic nerve of the eye, light travels to the SCN, signaling the internal clock that it is time to be awake.

What Is The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus?

The suprachiasmatic nucleus or nuclei (SCN) is a tiny region of the brain in the hypothalamus, situated directly above the optic chiasm. It is responsible for controlling circadian rhythms.

In the brain, a small group of hypothalamic nerve cells, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), functions as a master circadian pacemaker controlling the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and coordinating this with circadian rhythms in other brain areas and other tissues to enhance behavioral adaptation.

Hypothalamus acts as a master clock in the human body. The master circadian clock that regulates 24-hour cycles throughout our bodies is found in a region called the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the hypothalamus of the brain. The SCN regulates sleep, metabolism, and hormone production.

Circadian rhythms are biological patterns that closely follow a 24-hour cycle. The term circadian comes from the Latin for around (circa) and day (diem), and circadian rhythms govern a large number of biological processes including sleeping, eating, drinking, and hormone release.

In the 1960’s, researchers noticed that damage to the anterior hypothalamus of the rat caused a disruption in the animal’s circadian rhythms. Several years later, the specific nucleus in the hypothalamus whose integrity was necessary for maintaining circadian rhythms was identified as the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

The suprachiasmatic nucleus houses a type of biological clock that is able to keep our circadian rhythms on close to a 24-hour cycle, even without the help of external cues like daylight. Thus, if you were to lock someone in a room with no external light and no other way of telling the time, their body would still maintain a circadian rhythm of around 24 hours.

The suprachiasmatic nucleus helps to maintain circadian rhythms by coordinating the timing of billions of other circadian clocks found in cells throughout the rest of the brain and body.

Not long after the discovery of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, it was also learned that similar types of molecular clocks exist in most other peripheral tissues and in many areas of the brain. These clocks, sometimes called slave oscillators (while the suprachiasmatic nucleus is considered the master oscillator) appear to depend on signals generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus to synchronize their time-keeping with that of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

These signals can be associated with rhythms that the suprachiasmatic nucleus helps to establish, like feeding patterns, rest and activity behaviors or by direct neuronal or hormonal output from the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

What Is Melatonin and Why Is It So Important?

Melatonin is a ubiquitous natural neurotransmitter-like compound produced primarily by the pineal gland. This agent is involved in numerous aspects of the biological and physiologic regulation of body functions. The role of endogenous melatonin in circadian rhythm disturbances and sleep disorders is well established.

In humans and most mammals, melatonin is secreted at night with a robust circadian rhythm and maximum plasma levels that occur around 3 to 4 AM. The rhythmic release of melatonin is regulated by the central circadian rhythm generator—the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus.

It appears that the function of melatonin is to mediate dark signals and provide night information, a “hormone of darkness,” rather than be the hormone of sleep. It has also been thought to be an “endogenous synchronizer” that stabilizes and reinforces various circadian rhythms in the body.

If sleep occurs outside the biological night, its quality and duration are compromised. That is why endogenous melatonin is understood as a hormone which facilitates and reinforces sleep and other nighttime physiologic functions.

Melatonin is a hormone that the pineal gland in the brain produces. People can also take it as a natural or synthetic supplement to promote restful sleep. Melatonin fulfills many functions in the body, but it is mostly known for maintaining circadian rhythms.

The circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin is the best marker of internal time under low ambient light levels. The endogenous melatonin rhythm exhibits a close association with the endogenous circadian component of the sleep propensity rhythm. This has led to the idea that melatonin is an internal sleep “facilitator” in humans, and therefore useful in the treatment of insomnia and the readjustment of circadian rhythms.

What Is The Circadian Rhythm Diet?

The circadian rhythm diet, also known as the body clock diet, is basically a form of time-restricted eating plan where you eat in sync with this internal clock. “This means that you eat during the daylight hours, within a window of 12 hours or less and fast for the remaining 12 or more hours each day.

Biological activities like metabolism are closely linked to our circadian rhythm. Your metabolism changes throughout the day because of your circadian rhythm or natural body clock.

Your circadian rhythm is made up of several physical, mental, and behavioral changes that recur naturally on a 24-hour cycle. Every cell in your body follows this rhythm, as it dictates when they’re most metabolically active, when they produce hormones, and when they repair themselves.

Those recurring behaviors are intricately linked to your internal biological clock, which controls important functions throughout your body, from sleep patterns to hormone release to digestion.

Every tissue and organ in your body has its own biological clock that contributes to your body’s 24-hour cycle. That includes those involved with digestion and regulating your metabolism.

Every organ, hormone, and enzyme involved with digesting your food follows your circadian rhythm.

Your body works better if it knows when to expect to digest and process food. By optimizing your healthy eating patterns to stick to your circadian rhythm, you can enjoy myriad health and fitness benefits, including better neurological function.

One of the most effective ways to do this is through time-restricted eating. Limit meals to a window of eight to 10 hours during the day, when your body is most active. Allow your digestive system to rest for the remaining hours and while you sleep.

Our body will get used to the pattern, and with a consistently healthy diet, it will automatically optimize its own digestive rhythm.

Your circadian rhythm is about more than just sleep. In fact, your eating habits are just as important to keeping your body’s functions on track as your sleeping habits are. Respect the rhythm by creating and sticking to sleeping and eating patterns that are more closely aligned with it, and you might be surprised at how much more efficiently your body works.

Let’s continue to be conscious and proactive about making sure we are getting these vital phytonutrients in our diet and eating lifestyle with Nutrilite™ Perfect Pack.

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References: http://www.mymetabolicmeals.com, http://www.forbes.com, http://www.neuroscientificallychallenged.com, http://www.sciencedaily.com